Aftermarket Parts to be Analyzed in ‘Crash Test that Auto Insurance Bullies Don’t Want You to Know About’
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Aftermarket Parts to be Analyzed in ‘Crash Test that Auto Insurance Bullies Don’t Want You to Know About’

In the landmark lawsuit against John Eagle Collision Center, Dallas attorney Todd Tracy showed what happened when a body shop strays from OEM repair guidelines. Now he wants to show what happens when a shop uses aftermarket crash parts.

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Josh Cable has 17 years of experience as a writer and editor for newspapers, B2B publications and marketing organizations. His areas of expertise include U.S. manufacturing, lean/Six Sigma and workplace safety and health.

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In the landmark lawsuit against John Eagle Collision Center, Dallas attorney Todd Tracy showed what happened when a body shop strays from OEM repair guidelines. Now he wants to show what happens when a shop uses aftermarket crash parts.

In a Dec. 7 video, Tracy explains his plans to analyze the crashworthiness of aftermarket parts on a 2010 Honda Fit – the model that was at the center of the multi-million-dollar lawsuit against John Eagle.

Tracy says he plans to send three 2010 Honda Fits to KARCO Engineering’s crash-testing facility in Adelanto, Calif.

As Tracy explains in the video, one Honda Fit never has been involved in an accident and never has been repaired.

Burl’s Collision Center in Henderson, Texas, will make certain modifications to the other two Hondas.

On the second Honda Fit, the body shop will remove the OEM windshield and replace it with an aftermarket windshield, Tracy says. The shop also will remove the vehicle roof and re-attach it using 3M 8115 adhesive glue – a procedure that should sound familiar to anyone following the John Eagle case.

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On the third Honda Fit, the body shop will replace the front bumper, the front radiator support, a quarter panel, the door and all of the glass – and replace them with non-OEM-approved aftermarket parts.

Tracy’s plan is to subject all three vehicles to a 40-mph “narrow frontal-offset barrier” crash test and compare the results.

“Why are we doing this? Why are we putting our money where our mouth is?” Tracy asks. “Because for so long the insurance industry and the aftermarket industry has said, ‘You do not need to follow OEM repair specifications, that, ‘Our aftermarket parts are just as safe as the OEMs’ original parts.’ We’re putting those statements to a test.

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“We are using the scientific method to prove our point that the vehicle repair industry must follow the OEM repair specifications to the letter, and when they don’t, people die or get seriously injured.”

Tracy promises to share the results when the tests are completed.

Stay tuned.

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