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Aluminum Reintroduces Auto Body Industry to Training

If we’re not used to training yet, we’ll get there. After all, you don’t know what you don’t know.

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Jason Stahl has 27 years of experience as an editor, and has been editor of BodyShop Business for the past 15 years. He currently is a gold pin member of the Collision Industry Conference. Jason, who hails from Cleveland, Ohio, earned a bachelor of arts degree in English from John Carroll University and started his career in journalism at a weekly newspaper, doing everything from delivering newspapers to selling advertising space to writing articles.

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We as an industry stubbornly resist change. We also resist training. We want to think that our 20 years of experience means something, that we know what we’re doing. Unfortunately, with today’s computers on wheels, this is not the case.

That’s one of the good things about the F-150, as Mitch Becker wrote in his article last month, “Aluminum Repair: The Benefits Are Increasing.” It has reintroduced us to training. It might just have opened our minds (hopefully) to the idea that constant training may be the new norm.

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We may also have become accustomed to reading instructions, to referring to the specific automaker’s repair recommendations – something else we were loathe to do but something that is mandatory today.

It may also have re-energized us and our workplace. “Hey, what’s that new welder? I want to try it!” “An F-150 came in for repair? Cool! Can I work on it?”

These are all good things, amid all the negative we heard about aluminum. Scanning and recalibration will continue us along the path of training.

If we’re not used to training yet, we’ll get there. After all, you don’t know what you don’t know.

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