Chrysler Park Assist System Service and Repair - BodyShop Business

Chrysler Park Assist System Service and Repair

ALLDATA gives an excerpt of OE repair information for the 2011 Chrysler 300 V6-3.6L's park assist system.

We may not have flying cars yet, but not long ago, the capabilities of newer cars was the stuff of science fiction writers. Now you’re seeing vehicles with collision avoidance, navigation, parking assistance and many more sophisticated systems. Of course, all these electronics vary from make to make.

About the only sure thing in the collision repair business these days is that OE information is critical to repair a vehicle to ensure it conforms to safety, fit, function and appearance. Here is an excerpt of OE repair information from Chrysler on its park assist system in the 2011 Chrysler 300 V6-3.6L.

Service Information

Always refer to ALLDATA Collision for safety procedures, identification of material types, recommended refinish materials, removal and installation procedures. Always refer to the manufacturer for questions relating to applicable or non-applicable warranty repair information.

Park Assist Module — Removal
1. Disconnect and isolate the battery negative cable.
2. Remove the inner trim panel from the right quarter panel to access the park assist module (1), which is located just behind the right rear wheel well.
3. Remove the push-pin type retainers (1) that secure the park assist module to the inner panel (Figure 1).
4. Remove the module from the vehicle.

Park Assist Module — Installation
1. Position the park assist module (1) to the right inner panel, at the rear of the vehicle (Figure 1).
2. Install the push-pin type retainers (3) (Figure 1).
3. Connect the body wire harness connectors (2) to the module connector receptacles (Figure 1).
4. Install the trim onto the right quarter inner panel.
5. Connect the negative battery cable.

Park Assist Sensor — Removal
1. Disconnect and isolate the battery negative cable.
2. Remove rear fascia.
3. Unsnap the Park Assist Sensor from the retaining housing and remove from the fascia (Figure 2).

Park Assist Sensor — Installation
1. Position the Park Assist Sensor over the retaining housing and firmly snap into the housing in the rear fascia.
2. Install the rear fascia.
3. Connect the battery negative cable.

Park Assist System — Testing and Inspection, Component Tests
(Excerpted as an example only)

WARNING: To avoid serious or fatal injury on vehicles equipped with airbags, disable the Supplemental Restraint System (SRS) before attempting any steering wheel, steering column, airbag, seat belt tensioner, impact sensor or instrument panel component diagnosis or service. Disconnect and isolate the battery negative (ground) cable, then wait two minutes for the system capacitor to discharge before performing further diagnosis or service. This is the only sure way to disable the SRS. Failure to take the proper precautions could result in accidental airbag deployment.

NOTE: The presence of jackhammers, large trucks and other vibrations in the vicinity of the vehicle could impact the performance of the system.

The following textual messages may appear in the Electronic Vehicle Information Center (EVIC):

1. Service Park Assist – If a service park assist textual message appears in the EVIC display, the system may have a hard fault, and further investigation may be needed.

2. Clean Park Assist Sensors – If a clean park assist sensors textual message appears in the EVIC display, be certain to confirm the following:

  • The rear bumper is free of ice, snow, mud or other obstructions that will prevent the system from operating properly.
  • The park assist system is self-correcting; verify that the area of the rear bumper where the sensors are located is not blocked by ice, snow, mud or other obstructions. If the area is blocked, remove the blockage, shift the transmission selector lever into reverse and verify the message is no longer present in the EVIC display. The system may also be corrected when the vehicle is driven at a speed greater than 14 kph (8 mph).

3. Service Park Assist Sensors – If a service park assist sensors textual message appears in the EVIC display, a sensor or the sensor wiring may be damaged, and further investigation may be needed.

4. Park Assist Off – If a park assist OFF textual message appears in the EVIC display, the system may be manually cut-off.


Dan Espersen is ALLDATA’s senior collision program manager, holds an AA degree in automotive technology, and has 46 years of experience in the automotive industry, 19 in collision.

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