Mitchell Industry Trends Report Analyzes Japanese Tsunami's Effect on Parts Prices - BodyShop Business

Mitchell Industry Trends Report Analyzes Japanese Tsunami’s Effect on Parts Prices

This edition features the article, "Did the Tsunami in Japan Devastate Asian Parts Prices?" written by Mitchell's Vice President of Industry Relations Greg Horn. In the article, Horn leverages the Mitchell Collision Parts Price Index (MCPPI), a metric similar to the Consumer Price Index (CPI), to identify trends in parts prices vs. inflation and assess the impact of the tsunami on parts selection behavior.

Mitchell has released the fourth quarter 2011 edition of its Industry Trends Report (ITR), the company’s quarterly publication that highlights industry related trends, news items and statistics.  
 
This edition features the article, "Did the Tsunami in Japan Devastate Asian Parts Prices?" written by Mitchell’s Vice President of Industry Relations Greg Horn. In the article, Horn leverages the Mitchell Collision Parts Price Index (MCPPI), a metric similar to the Consumer Price Index (CPI), to identify trends in parts prices vs. inflation and assess the impact of the tsunami on parts selection behavior.

Mitchell says it created the MCPPI specifically for the collision repair industry and designed it to analyze and track parts price changes using the industry’s most comprehensive data for the top 20 most replaced collision parts.

Using the latest MCPPI data to analyze the most replaced collision parts and contrasting it with a subset of Japanese-only vehicle parts reveals the true impact of the tragic tsunami this past spring on Japanese vehicle parts pricing, including whether costs increased as a result of shortages, according to Mitchell.

"The tsunami in Japan was incredibly tragic and affected so many. After having a chance to absorb the dramatic impact on their nation, we wanted to see how it would affect the collision repair community," said Horn. "Our in-depth analysis using the MCPPI indicates the tsunami had little net impact on parts pricing. Isolating the Japanese vehicle make parts index and breaking out the subset of Japanese make vehicles by part type shows that the Japanese vehicle index mirrors broader market trends. In the aggregate, parts prices increased, even in a year where inflation has slowed to the lowest rate since we began measuring the index. OEM indexed parts decreased in price while aftermarket and remanufactured parts increased slightly. Spot shortages and hoarding may have occurred immediately after the tragic events in the spring but had little material impact on Japanese vehicle parts prices."  

Horn added, "Delving into insurance claims data is yet another way we demonstrate our commitment to helping the P&C and collision repair industries assess marketplace conditions and adjust accordingly, which is critical, since parts comprise approximately 42 percent of average repairable estimate dollars and directly impact estimate severity. Being aware of the impact of significant events and being armed with the latest collision repair information and analysis helps our clients increase customer satisfaction, thus improving their business performance."

Other points of interest in the current issue of Mitchell’s ITR include:

• The initial Average Appraisal Value, calculated by combining data from all first and third-party repairable vehicle appraisals uploaded through Mitchell systems in Q3-2011, was $2,536 —$3 lower than the previous year’s Q3-2010 appraisal average. Applying the prescribed development factor of 2 percent to these data produces a final anticipated value of $2,587.

• Mitchell’s Q3-2011 data reflect an initial average gross collision appraisal value of $2,812 — $55 less than this same period last year. However, applying the indicated development factor of 3 percent suggests a final Q3-2011 average gross collision appraisal value of $2,884 — an increase of $17.

• The average Actual Cash Value (ACV) of vehicles appraised for collision losses during Q3-2011 exceeded $14,000 for the first time.

• In Q3-2011, the average gross appraisal value for comprehensive coverage estimates processed through Mitchell servers was $2,694 — compared to $2,600 in Q3-2010. Applying the prescribed development factor of .19 percent produces a $99 increase. The low supplement amount result reflects the heavy hail appraisals written during the quarter.


More information:

Complete content is available in the latest Industry Trends Report, which may be downloaded in PDF format from the Mitchell website

Follow Mitchell on Twitter @Mitchell_Intl 

You May Also Like

Protect Your Shop from Cyber Crimes with Mark Riddell

Micki Woods interviews Mark Riddell of m3 Networks Limited on what auto body shops can do to protect themselves from a cyber attack.

Micki Woods, master marketer for collision repair shops and owner of Micki Woods Marketing, has released the latest episode of "Body Bangin'," the video podcast that is taking the industry by storm!

In this episode, Woods interviews Mark Riddell, managing director of m3 Networks Limited, about how auto body shops are looked at as small businesses and easy prey for cyber attackers and what they can do to protect themselves and their customers' data.

Body Bangin’: The Disengagement Epidemic with Kevin Wolfe

Micki Woods interviews Leaders Way Owner Kevin Wolfe on why 73% of work professionals are disengaged today and what we can do about it.

Body Bangin’: I Thought We Were Doing It Right with Josh Piccione

Micki Woods interviews Josh Piccione on repairing vehicles correctly — according to manufacturer guidelines.

Body Bangin’: Be a Star Not a Hamster with Robert Snook

Micki Woods interviews popular keynote speaker Robert Snook on how to differentiate and grow your business.

Body Bangin’: Know Me, Know My Car with Mike Anderson

Micki Woods interviews Mike Anderson on the importance of building an emotional connection with your customers.

Other Posts

Body Bangin’: Fighting for Consumer Safety with Burl Richards

Micki Woods interviews Burl Richards on his personal mission to fight for consumers’ rights and safety.

Body Bangin’: The Employer-Student Disconnect

Micki Woods interviews Raven Hartkopf, lead collision instructor at Collin College in Texas, on what students want from a shop employer.

Body Bangin’: Why Follow OEM Repair Procedures?

Micki Woods interviews Logan Payne of Payne & Sons Paint & Body Shop on the importance of following OEM repair procedures.

Body Bangin’: Getting Paid for Calibrations

Micki Woods interviews Andy Hipwell and James Rodis of OEM Calibration on how to get started doing ADAS calibrations.