Mike Anderson to Offer Follow-up Webinar on Nissan/Infiniti OEM Information

Mike Anderson to Offer Follow-up Webinar on Nissan/Infiniti OEM Information

Anderson’s free “Learn to Research, Research to Learn” webinar on May 24 will be a follow-up to the previous month’s session, offering even more insights into obtaining technical repair information for Nissan and Infiniti vehicles.

Collision Advice has announced that Mike Anderson will be offering a free webinar on tips for using Nissan/Infiniti OEM information.

Anderson’s free “Learn to Research, Research to Learn” webinar on May 24 at 2 p.m. EST/11 a.m. PST will be a follow-up to the previous month’s session, offering even more insights into obtaining technical repair information for Nissan and Infiniti vehicles.

“There are additional resources from the automaker we didn’t get to in the first webinar, and I want to address some of the questions that were texted-in last month that we didn’t have time to cover,” said Anderson. “We also will discuss using the Nissan/Infiniti scan tool.”

To register for the webinar, visit: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4687174478643532802.

Anderson of Collision Advice launched his new series of monthly webinars earlier this year to help shops more easily research and use OEM collision repair information. As with previous sessions in the series, this month’s follow-up webinar with Nissan/Infiniti will be available for later viewing at the Collision Advice website, but registering for the webinar ensures you are notified when it is posted if you miss the live event.

Webinar attendees will be able to text-in questions during the live event. Attendees will need to use their computer audio for the webinar; no phone dial-in will be available.

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